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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2467

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: A single-trace dual-process model of episodic memory: A novel computational account of familiarity and recollection
Author(s): Greve, Andrea
Donaldson, David
van, Rossum Mark C W
Contact Email: did1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: episodic memory model
Hopfield network
recognition
recollection
familiarity
Issue Date: Feb-2010
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell / Wiley-Liss, Inc
Citation: Greve A, Donaldson D & van Rossum MCW (2010) A single-trace dual-process model of episodic memory: A novel computational account of familiarity and recollection, Hippocampus, 20 (2), pp. 235-251.
Abstract: Dual-process theories of episodic memory state that retrieval is contingent on two independent processes: familiarity (providing a sense of oldness) and recollection (recovering events and their context). A variety of studies have reported distinct neural signatures for familiarity and recollection, supporting dual-process theory. One outstanding question is whether these signatures reflect the activation of distinct memory traces or the operation of different retrieval mechanisms on a single memory trace. We present a computational model that uses a single neuronal network to store memory traces, but two distinct and independent retrieval processes access the memory. The model is capable of performing familiarity and recollection-based discrimination between old and new patterns, demonstrating that dual-process models need not to rely on multiple independent memory traces, but can use a single trace. Importantly, our putative familiarity and recollection processes exhibit distinct characteristics analogous to those found in empirical data; they diverge in capacity and sensitivity to sparse and correlated patterns, exhibit distinct ROC curves, and account for performance on both item and associative recognition tests. The demonstration that a single-trace, dual-process model can account for a range of empirical findings highlights the importance of distinguishing between neuronal processes and the neuronal representations on which they operate.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2467
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hipo.20606
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Notes: DOI: 10.1002/hipo.20606
Affiliation: Cardiff University
Psychology
University of Edinburgh

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