Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22540
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dc.contributor.authorWetherall, Karen-
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorRobb, Kathryn-
dc.contributor.authorWood, Alex M-
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Rory C-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-20T23:39:18Z-
dc.date.issued2015-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/22540-
dc.description.abstractPurpose Low income is an established risk factor for suicidal thoughts and attempts. This study aims to explore income within a social rank perspective, proposing that the relationship between income and suicidality is accounted for by the rank of that income within comparison groups.  Methods Participants (N=5779) took part in the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey across England. An income rank variable was created by ranking each individual’s income within four comparison groups (sex by education, education by region, sex by region, and sex by education by region). Along with absolute income and demographic covariates, these variables were tested for associations with suicidal thoughts and attempts, both across the lifetime and in the past year.  Results Absolute income was associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts, both across the lifetime and in the past year. However, when income rank within the four comparison groups was regressed on lifetime suicidal thoughts and attempts, only income rank remained significant and therefore accounted for this relationship. A similar result was found for suicidal thoughts within the past year although the pattern was less clear for suicide attempts in the past year.  Conclusions Social position, rather than absolute income, may be more important in understanding suicidal thoughts and attempts. This suggests that it may be psychosocial rather than material factors that explain the relationship between income and suicidal outcomes.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relationWetherall K, Daly M, Robb K, Wood AM & O'Connor RC (2015) Explaining the income and suicidality relationship: Income rank is more strongly associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts than income, Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 50 (6), pp. 929-937.-
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.subjectSuicideen_UK
dc.subjectSocial rank theoryen_UK
dc.subjectIncomeen_UK
dc.subjectSocial comparisonsen_UK
dc.subjectDefeaten_UK
dc.titleExplaining the income and suicidality relationship: Income rank is more strongly associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts than incomeen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-015-1050-1-
dc.identifier.pmid25893994-
dc.citation.jtitleSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology-
dc.citation.issn0933-7954-
dc.citation.volume50-
dc.citation.issue6-
dc.citation.spage929-
dc.citation.epage937-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.author.emailmichael.daly@stir.ac.uk-
dc.citation.date18/04/2015-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgow-
dc.contributor.affiliationManagement Work and Organisation-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgow-
dc.contributor.affiliationManagement Work and Organisation-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgow-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
dc.identifier.isi000354951800009-
Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles

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