Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2238
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dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Alasdair C-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T00:31:47Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-21T00:31:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/2238-
dc.description.abstractSince 1997 the UK Government has sought to expand the provision of public services by the independent nonprofit sector. With policies to build the capacity of the sector, public spending on voluntary organisations has grown from £2 billion in 1996/97 to £6.88 billion in 2005/06. Theory suggests that the comparative advantage of nonprofits lies in the mission-motivation of those who work in them, and predicts that motivated workers will accept lower wages. We examine sector wage differentials in time-series to show that growth in voluntary sector wages has outpaced the private and public sectors. This state intervention in the market has had big consequences for the make-up of the voluntary sector workforce.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.relationRutherford AC (2010) On the Up: Voluntary Sector Wages in the UK 1998 - 2007. Stirling Economics Discussion Paper, 2010-06.-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStirling Economics Discussion Paper, 2010-06-
dc.subjectCompensating Wageen_UK
dc.subjectWarm Glowen_UK
dc.subjectNonprofiten_UK
dc.subjectVoluntary Sectoren_UK
dc.subject.lcshVoluntarism Management-
dc.subject.lcshNonprofit organizations-
dc.subject.lcshWage differentials-
dc.titleOn the Up: Voluntary Sector Wages in the UK 1998 - 2007en_UK
dc.typeWorking or Discussion Paperen_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusUnpublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedUnrefereed-
dc.type.statusAuthor Version-
dc.author.emailar34@stir.ac.uk-
dc.subject.jelJ21-
dc.subject.jelJ31-
dc.subject.jelH44-
dc.contributor.affiliationEconomics-
Appears in Collections:Economics Working Papers

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