Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22143
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dc.contributor.authorParker, Thomasen_UK
dc.contributor.authorSubke, Jens-Arneen_UK
dc.contributor.authorWookey, Philipen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T22:23:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-13T22:23:17Z-
dc.date.issued2015-05en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/22143-
dc.description.abstractClimate warming at high northern latitudes has caused substantial increases in plant productivity of tundra vegetation and an expansion of the range of deciduous shrub species. However significant the increase in carbon (C) contained within above-ground shrub biomass, it is modest in comparison with the amount of C stored in the soil in tundra ecosystems. Here, we use a ‘space-for-time' approach to test the hypothesis that a shift from lower-productivity tundra heath to higher-productivity deciduous shrub vegetation in the sub-Arctic may lead to a loss of soil C that out-weighs the increase in above-ground shrub biomass. We further hypothesize that a shift from ericoid to ectomycorrhizal systems coincident with this vegetation change provides a mechanism for the loss of soil C. We sampled soil C stocks, soil surface CO2 flux rates and fungal growth rates along replicated natural transitions from birch forest (Betula pubescens), through deciduous shrub tundra (Betula nana) to tundra heaths (Empetrum nigrum) near Abisko, Swedish Lapland. We demonstrate that organic horizon soil organic C (SOCorg) is significantly lower at shrub (2.98±0.48kgm-2) and forest (2.04±0.25kgm-2) plots than at heath plots (7.03±0.79kgm-2). Shrub vegetation had the highest respiration rates, suggesting that despite higher rates of C assimilation, C turnover was also very high and less C is sequestered in the ecosystem. Growth rates of fungal hyphae increased across the transition from heath to shrub, suggesting that the action of ectomycorrhizal symbionts in the scavenging of organically bound nutrients is an important pathway by which soil C is made available to microbial degradation. The expansion of deciduous shrubs onto potentially vulnerable arctic soils with large stores of C could therefore represent a significant positive feedback to the climate system.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherWiley Blackwellen_UK
dc.relationParker T, Subke J & Wookey P (2015) Rapid carbon turnover beneath shrub and tree vegetation is associated with low soil carbon stocks at a subarctic treeline. Global Change Biology, 21 (5), pp. 2070-2081. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12793en_UK
dc.rightsThis article is open-access. Open access publishing allows free access to and distribution of published articles where the author retains copyright of their work by employing a Creative Commons attribution licence. Proper attribution of authorship and correct citation details should be given.en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectBetulaen_UK
dc.subjectcarbon inventoryen_UK
dc.subjectdwarf birchen_UK
dc.subjectectomycorrhizaen_UK
dc.subjectgas fluxen_UK
dc.subjectshrub expansionen_UK
dc.subjectsoil carbon cyclingen_UK
dc.subjectsubarcticen_UK
dc.titleRapid carbon turnover beneath shrub and tree vegetation is associated with low soil carbon stocks at a subarctic treelineen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/gcb.12793en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid25367088en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleGlobal Change Biologyen_UK
dc.citation.issn1365-2486en_UK
dc.citation.issn1354-1013en_UK
dc.citation.volume21en_UK
dc.citation.issue5en_UK
dc.citation.spage2070en_UK
dc.citation.epage2081en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.author.emailjens-arne.subke@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date18/02/2015en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000353220500025en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84927963511en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid599174en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-3648-5316en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-9244-639Xen_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-5957-6424en_UK
dc.date.accepted2014-10-16en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2015-08-20en_UK
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