Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22038
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dc.contributor.authorOliver, David-
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Kenneth-
dc.contributor.authorHeathwaite, A Louise-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ting-
dc.contributor.authorQuilliam, Richard-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-15T00:51:48Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-15T00:51:48Z-
dc.date.issued2015-06-
dc.identifier.other426-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/22038-
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the role of different rainfall scenarios on faecal indicator organism (FIO) dynamics under variable field conditions is important to strengthen the evidence base on which regulators and land managers can base informed decisions regarding diffuse microbial pollution risks. We sought to investigate the impact of low intensity summer rainfall on Escherichia coli-discharge (Q) patterns at the headwater catchment scale in order to provide new empirical data on FIO concentrations observed during baseflow conditions. In addition, we evaluated the potential impact of using automatic samplers to collect and store freshwater samples for subsequent microbial analysis during summer storm sampling campaigns. The temporal variation of E. coli concentrations with Q was captured during six events throughout a relatively dry summer in central Scotland. The relationship between E. coli concentration and Q was complex with no discernible patterns of cell emergence with Q that were repeated across all events. On several occasions, an order of magnitude increase in E. coli concentrations occurred even with slight increases in Q, but responses were not consistent and highlighted the challenges of attempting to characterise temporal responses of E. coli concentrations relative to Q during low intensity rainfall. Crosscomparison of E. coli concentrations determined in water samples using simultaneous manual grab and automated sample collection was undertaken with no difference in concentrations observed between methods. However, the duration of sample storage within the autosampler unit was found to be more problematic in terms of impacting on the representativeness of microbial water quality, with unrefrigerated autosamplers exhibiting significantly different concentrations of E. coli relative to initial samples after 12-h storage. The findings from this study provide important empirical contributions to the growing evidence base in the field of catchment microbial dynamics.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relationOliver D, Porter K, Heathwaite AL, Zhang T & Quilliam R (2015) Impact of low intensity summer rainfall on E. coli-discharge event dynamics with reference to sample acquisition and storage, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 187 (7), Art. No.: 426.-
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository; The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-015-4628-x-
dc.subjectAutosampleren_UK
dc.subjectClimate changeen_UK
dc.subjectDiffuse pollutionen_UK
dc.subjectFaecal indicator organismen_UK
dc.subjectStormeventen_UK
dc.subjectWater qualityen_UK
dc.titleImpact of low intensity summer rainfall on E. coli-discharge event dynamics with reference to sample acquisition and storageen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2016-06-15T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonPublisher requires embargo of 12 months after formal publication.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-015-4628-x-
dc.citation.jtitleEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessment-
dc.citation.issn0167-6369-
dc.citation.volume187-
dc.citation.issue7-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPost-print (author final draft post-refereeing)-
dc.author.emaildavid.oliver@stir.ac.uk-
dc.citation.date12/06/2015-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.contributor.affiliationLancaster University-
dc.contributor.affiliationLancaster University-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.identifier.isi000357340500034-
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles

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