Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18375
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dc.contributor.authorGoulson, Dave-
dc.contributor.authorPark, Kirsty-
dc.contributor.authorTinsley, M C-
dc.contributor.authorBussiere, Luc-
dc.contributor.authorVallejo-Marin, Mario-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-21T23:08:28Z-
dc.date.issued2013-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/18375-
dc.description.abstractBumblebees have been found to observe and copy the behaviour of others with regard to floral choices, particularly when investigating novel flower types. They can also learn to make nectar-robbing holes in flowers as a result of encountering them. Here, we investigate handedness in nectar-robbing bumblebees feeding on Rhinanthus minor, a flower that can be robbed from either the right-hand side or the left-hand side. We studied numerous patches of R. minor spread across an alpine landscape; each patch tended to be robbed on either the right or the left. The intensity of side bias increased through the season and was strongest in the most heavily robbed patches. We suggest that bees within patches learn robbing strategies (including handedness) from one another, either by direct observation or from experience with the location of holes, leading to rapid frequency-dependent selection for a common strategy. Primary robbing was predominantly carried out not only by a specialist robbing species, Bombus wurflenii, but also by Bombus lucorum, a widespread generalist. Both species adopted the same handedness within particular flower patches, providing the first evidence for social learning crossing the species boundary in wild insects.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relationGoulson D, Park K, Tinsley MC, Bussiere L & Vallejo-Marin M (2013) Social learning drives handedness in nectar-robbing bumblebees, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 67 (7), pp. 1141-1150.-
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.subjectBombusen_UK
dc.subjectForaging behaviouren_UK
dc.subjectFloral larcenyen_UK
dc.subjectLearningen_UK
dc.subjectApidaeen_UK
dc.subjectHymenopteraen_UK
dc.titleSocial learning drives handedness in nectar-robbing bumblebeesen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-013-1539-0-
dc.citation.jtitleBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology-
dc.citation.issn0340-5443-
dc.citation.volume67-
dc.citation.issue7-
dc.citation.spage1141-
dc.citation.epage1150-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.author.emailk.j.park@stir.ac.uk-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciences-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
dc.identifier.isi000320024200011-
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles

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