Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10853
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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, S Craig-
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Anthony-
dc.contributor.authorGosling, L Morris-
dc.contributor.authorPerrett, David I-
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Vaughan-
dc.contributor.authorJones, Benedict C-
dc.contributor.authorPenton-Voak, Ian S-
dc.contributor.authorPetrie, Marion-
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-09T23:04:52Z-
dc.date.issued2005-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/10853-
dc.description.abstractFemales gain direct or indirect fitness benefits by choosing between males with traits indicating "good genes," but we usually know very little about the nature of these genes. However, it has been suggested that genetic quality may often be defined as heterozygosity at certain loci. Here, we show that heterozygosity at three key loci in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with facial attractiveness: Faces of men who are heterozygous at all three loci are judged more attractive by women than faces of men who are homozygous at one or more of these loci. MHC genes code for proteins involved in immune response. Consistent with this function, faces of MHC heterozygotes are also perceived to be healthier. In a separate test, in the absence of any other cues, patches of skin from the cheeks of heterozygotes are judged healthier than skin of homozygotes, and these ratings correlate with attractiveness judgements for the whole face. Because levels of MHC similarity can influence mate preferences in animals and humans, we conducted a second experiment with genotyped women raters, finding that preferences for heterozygosity are independent of the degree of MHC similarity between the men and the female raters. Our results are the first to directly link facial attractiveness and a measure of genetic quality and suggest a mechanism to help explain common consensus concerning individual attractiveness.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.relationRoberts SC, Little A, Gosling LM, Perrett DI, Carter V, Jones BC, Penton-Voak IS & Petrie M (2005) MHC-heterozygosity and human facial attractiveness, Evolution and Human Behavior, 26 (3), pp. 213-226.-
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.subjectMHCen_UK
dc.subjectHLAen_UK
dc.subjectmate choiceen_UK
dc.subjectdisassortativeen_UK
dc.subjectgood genesen_UK
dc.subjectbeautyen_UK
dc.titleMHC-heterozygosity and human facial attractivenessen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2004.09.002-
dc.citation.jtitleEvolution and Human Behavior-
dc.citation.issn1090-5138-
dc.citation.volume26-
dc.citation.issue3-
dc.citation.spage213-
dc.citation.epage226-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.author.emailcraig.roberts@stir.ac.uk-
dc.contributor.affiliationPsychology-
dc.contributor.affiliationPsychology-
dc.contributor.affiliationNewcastle University-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of St Andrews-
dc.contributor.affiliationNational Blood Service-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Aberdeen-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Bristol-
dc.contributor.affiliationNewcastle University-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
dc.identifier.isi000229360200001-
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles

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