Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9314

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Holistic Versus Featural Facial Composite Systems for People with Mild Intellectual Disabilities
Authors: Gawrylowicz, Julie
Gabbert, Fiona
Carson, Derek
Lindsay, William
Hancock, Peter J B
Contact Email: pjbh1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Eyewitness Memory
Facial Composites
Intellectual Disability
Issue Date: Sep-2012
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Gawrylowicz J, Gabbert F, Carson D, Lindsay W & Hancock PJB (2012) Holistic Versus Featural Facial Composite Systems for People with Mild Intellectual Disabilities, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 26 (5), pp. 716-720.
Abstract: Limited verbal abilities might act as a barrier to witnesses with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) to provide accurate testimony. This might be particularly problematic when the police need to create a facial composite image. Contrary to featural composite systems such as Electronic Facial Identification Technique (E-FIT), holistic systems such as Evolutionary Facial Identification Technique (EvoFIT) do not require the witness to provide a verbal description of a perpetrator's face. Instead, they rely more on face recognition, which may make them more suitable for people with ID. The current study compared the performance of people with and without ID at creating composites using E-FIT and EvoFIT. Although ID composites created with EvoFIT were more often accurately identified than E-FIT composites, the performance of ID participants was overall very poor across both systems and considerably poorer than that of non-ID participants. The implications of these findings for practitioners working in the Criminal Justice System are discussed.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9314
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.2850
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Royal Holloway
University of Abertay
University of Abertay
University of Abertay
Psychology

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