Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Stories of weight management: Factors associated with successful and unsuccessful weight maintenance
Authors: Chambers, Julie
Swanson, Vivien
Contact Email:
Issue Date: May-2012
Citation: Chambers J & Swanson V (2012) Stories of weight management: Factors associated with successful and unsuccessful weight maintenance, British Journal of Health Psychology, 17 (2), pp. 223-243.
Abstract: Objective. Although behavioural interventions are successful in achieving short-term weight loss, most individuals regain most or all of their weight within a few years. Our aim was to investigate factors that can help in long-term weight maintenance. Design. Qualitative interviews were conducted in order to elicit experiences, successes, and difficulties associated with weight control over the lifespan. Methods. Participants were 20 adult volunteers (aged 30-67) including lifelong weight maintainers, active weight maintainers who have maintained weight loss, and weight gainers. Thematic analysis was used to highlight differences between weight groups. Results. Successful weight maintainers adopt a staged approach to weight management, including monitoring weight fluctuations and having a clear alarm signal for weight gain that triggers immediate action. They have several behavioural strategies for weight control, comprising relatively small adjustments to diet and/or exercise behaviour and also have clear strategies for coping with lifestyle interruptions. In contrast, unsuccessful weight maintainers display negative cognitive factors, including erratic or inconsistent weight vigilance, failure to respond to warning signs of weight gain, and failure to restrict weight unless in a positive mindset. Further, their coping strategies for weight gain or failed actions are poor. Conclusions. The results suggest that successful weight maintainers, irrespective of current weight band, adopt a staged behavioural approach to weight management that allows them to maintain a fairly stable weight. Encouraging the use of such strategies in those who typically regain weight after dieting may aid them in maintaining weight loss.
Type: Journal Article
DOI Link:
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
j.2044-8287.2011.02030.x.pdf556.32 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.