Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9158

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Type D personality and cardiac output in response to stress
Authors: Williams, Lynn
O'Carroll, Ronan
O'Connor, Rory
Contact Email: ronan.ocarroll@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Adult
Adults
Affect
AFFILIATION
age
C
cardiovascular disease
Distress
evidence
experiment
Female
Females
Health
INDIVIDUALS
language
Male
MALES
MECHANISM
MECHANISMS
mental
MENTAL arithmetic
negative affect
NUMBER
outcome
PARTICIPANTS
patient
Patients
Personality
PHASE
Psychological distress
PSYCHOLOGY
reactivity
relationship
social inhibition
Stirling
Stress
TASK
time
Type D personality
UK
universities
YOUNG adults
Issue Date: Jun-2009
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Citation: Williams L, O'Carroll R & O'Connor R (2009) Type D personality and cardiac output in response to stress, Psychology and Health, 24 (5), pp. 489-500.
Abstract: Type D personality is predictive of adverse clinical outcome and psychological distress in cardiac patients. However, the mechanisms by which Type D affects health are largely unknown. This study (1) investigated the relationship between Type D and cardiovascular reactivity to experimentally induced stress and (2) tested the influence of Type D on subjective feelings of stress. Eighty four healthy young adults (50% males, mean (SD) age 22 (6.84) years), completed measures of Type D personality, stress arousal and a stress-inducing procedure involving a taxing mental arithmetic task. Cardiovascular measures were recorded throughout the experiment. Mixed measures ANOVA showed a significant main effect of Type D and a significant group by time effect of Type D on cardiac output in male participants. Type D males exhibit significantly higher cardiac output during the stressor phase compared to non-Type D males. However, there was no relationship between Type D and cardiovascular reactivity in females. In addition, Type D individuals exhibited significantly higher feelings of subjective stress compared to non-Type D's. These findings provide new evidence on Type D and suggest that Type D may affect health through increased cardiac output and higher subjective feelings of stress following acute stress.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9158
URL: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sph&AN=40627338&site=ehost-live
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08870440701885616
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Stirling
Psychology
Psychology

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