Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9070

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Suicidal behaviour
Authors: O'Connor, Rory
Sheehy, Noel
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jan-2001
Publisher: The British Psychological Society
Citation: O'Connor R & Sheehy N (2001) Suicidal behaviour, The Psychologist, 14 (1), pp. 20-24.
Abstract: The suicide rate increased steadily throughout the 1980s and much of the 1990s. Recent statistics suggest that it is stabilising (McClure, 2000), but it is estimated that between eight and 14 people per 100,000 kill themselves each year. In actual terms, suicide is no longer an unusual kind of death. There are a variety of views on suicidal behaviour. Some, like Albert Camus, argue that judging whether life is or is not worth living is the only true philosophical question. Others view suicide as the outcome of a disturbed mind caused by biological processes that can only be explained using psychiatric concepts and labels. Such an approach might be caricatured as the 'Bad Apple' explanation of suicide: If only the bad apples (the suicidal) could be distinguished from the 'good apples'; by identifying the telltale worm that leads to suicide, they could be given appropriate therapy at an early stage. Still others see suicide as the result of society’s impact on the individual. This approach is less concerned with identifying bad apples, instead focusing on the effects of rotten barrels – social factors. So how have we come to understand suicide? What has psychology contributed to our understanding of this complex problem? These are questions that are asked time and again; unfortunately answers remain elus
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9070
URL: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=yv4JPVwI&eid=2-s2.0-0002618627&md5=d31a373311dd3255dec0979c780e04da
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University

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