Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9068
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Religiosity, stress and psychological distress: No evidence for an association among undergraduate students
Authors: O'Connor, Daryl B
Cobb, Joanna
O'Connor, Rory
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Religiosity
Stress
General health
Psychological distress
Coping
Undergraduates
Issue Date: Feb-2003
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: O'Connor DB, Cobb J & O'Connor R (2003) Religiosity, stress and psychological distress: No evidence for an association among undergraduate students, Personality and Individual Differences, 34 (2), pp. 211-217.
Abstract: The relationship between religion and mental and physical health has received substantial scientific interest. It has been suggested that indicators of religiosity are inversely associated with aspects of psychological distress. The aim of the present study was to investigate further the relationship between religiosity, stress and psychological distress. One hundred and seventy-seven undergraduate students completed the Francis Scale of Attitude Towards Christianity (FSAC), the Stress Arousal Checklist, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) and the Multi-dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. No association was found between scores on the FSAC, the measure of stress, social support or the GHQ-30. Stress and social support were the only variables significantly associated with scores on the GHQ-30. The results of the present study provide evidence, among an undergraduate sample, that religiosity is not associated with psychological distress.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9068
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0191-8869(02)00035-1
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Leeds
University of Leeds
Psychology

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