Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9065

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Subjective experience and the attentional lapse: Task engagement and disengagement during sustained attention
Authors: Smallwood, Jonathan
Davies, John
Heim, Derek
Finnigan, Frances
Sudbery, Megan V
O'Connor, Rory
Obonsawin, Marc
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Attentional lapses
Action slips
Task unrelated thought
Subjective experience
Awareness
Sustained attention
Issue Date: Dec-2004
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Smallwood J, Davies J, Heim D, Finnigan F, Sudbery MV, O'Connor R & Obonsawin M (2004) Subjective experience and the attentional lapse: Task engagement and disengagement during sustained attention, Consciousness and Cognition, 13 (4), pp. 657-690.
Abstract: Three experiments investigated the relationship between subjective experience and attentional lapses during sustained attention. These experiments employed two measures of subjective experience (thought probes and questionnaires) to examine how differences in awareness correspond to variations in both task performance (reaction time and errors) and psycho-physiological measures (heart rate and galvanic skin response). This series of experiments examine these phenomena during the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART, Robertson, Manly, Andrade, Baddeley, & Yiend, 1997). The results suggest we can dissociate between two components of subjective experience during sustained attention: (A) task unrelated thought which corresponds to an absent minded disengagement from the task and (B) a pre-occupation with one's task performance that seems to be best conceptualised as a strategic attempt to deploy attentional resources in response to a perception of environmental demands which exceed ones ability to perform the task. The implications of these findings for our understanding of how awareness is maintained on task relevant material during periods of sustained attention are discussed.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9065
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2004.06.003
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Glasgow Caledonian University
University of Strathclyde
University of Strathclyde
Glasgow Caledonian University
University of Strathclyde
Psychology
University of Strathclyde

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