Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9058
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Predicting depression, anxiety and self-harm in adolescents: The role of perfectionism and acute life stress
Authors: O'Connor, Rory
Rasmussen, Susan
Hawton, Keith
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Perfectionism
Diathesis–stress
Prospective
Self-harm
Depression
Anxiety
Issue Date: Jan-2010
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: O'Connor R, Rasmussen S & Hawton K (2010) Predicting depression, anxiety and self-harm in adolescents: The role of perfectionism and acute life stress, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48 (1), pp. 52-59.
Abstract: Despite the growing evidence that perfectionism is associated with adolescent psychological distress, few studies have investigated this relationship prospectively with measures designed for use in adolescent populations. In the present study, within a diathesis–stress framework, we investigated the extent to which perfectionism and acute life stress predict depression, anxiety and self-harm among adolescent school children (n=515) over a 6 month period (Time 1–Time 2). Socially prescribed perfectionism (SPP), self-oriented perfectionism–critical (SOP-critical) and the associated interactions with acute life stress differentially predicted anxiety, depression and self-harm. Acute life stress was an independent predictor of depression, anxiety and self-harm. SPP predicted depression and interacted with acute life stress to predict self-harm. SOP-critical and the SOP-critical by acute life stress interaction predicted anxiety. Self-oriented perfectionism-striving (SOP-striving) did not predict any of the Time 2 measures of distress. The dimensions of perfectionism are differentially associated with psychological distress. Tailored clinical interventions focused on adolescent perfectionism should offer promise in tackling psychological morbidity in adolescence.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9058
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2009.09.008
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology
Psychology
Warneford Hospital

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