Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9054

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Distinguishing adolescents who think about self-harm from those who engage in self-harm
Authors: O'Connor, Rory
Rasmussen, Susan
Hawton, Keith
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Apr-2012
Publisher: The Royal College of Psychiatrists
Citation: O'Connor R, Rasmussen S & Hawton K (2012) Distinguishing adolescents who think about self-harm from those who engage in self-harm, British Journal of Psychiatry, 200 (4), pp. 330-335.
Abstract: Background - Adolescent self-harm is a major public health concern, yet little is known about the factors that distinguish adolescents who think about self-harm but do not act on these thoughts from those who act on such thoughts. Aims - Within a new theoretical model, the integrated motivational-volitional model, we investigated factors associated with adolescents having thoughts of self-harm (ideators) v. those associated with self-harm enaction (enactors). Method - Observational study of school pupils employing an anonymous self-report survey to compare three groups of adolescents: self-harm enactors (n = 628) v. self-harm ideators (n = 675) v. those without any self-harm history (n = 4219). Results - Enactors differed from ideators on all of the volitional factors. Relative to ideators, enactors were more likely to have a family member/close friend who had self-harmed, more likely to think that their peers engaged in self-harm and they were more impulsive than the ideators. Enactors also reported more life stress than ideators. Conversely, the two self-harm groups did not differ on any of the variables associated with the development of self-harm thoughts. Conclusions - As more adolescents think about self-harm than engage in it, a better understanding of the factors that govern behavioural enaction is crucial in the effective assessment of the risk of self-harm.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/9054
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.111.097808
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology
Psychology
University of Oxford

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