Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8998
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Cognitive style and suicidal behaviour: Implications for therapeutic intervention, research lacunae and priorities
Authors: Sheehy, Noel
O'Connor, Rory
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Citation: Sheehy N & O'Connor R (2002) Cognitive style and suicidal behaviour: Implications for therapeutic intervention, research lacunae and priorities, British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 30 (4), pp. 353-362.
Abstract: Cognitive style is a well-established theoretical construct but there is considerable ambiguity in the way it has been used and uncertainty regarding the nature of its role in suicide. There is no evidence that specific cognitive dispositions prime people for suicide but there are indications that suicide is associated with a constriction in cognitive style. This constriction leads to decrements in problem-solving and information processing that can be addressed in therapeutic contexts. To help a suicidal person become a better problem- solver is not a trivial task but the evidence suggests that enriching cognitive styles through the development of thinking skills is possible when the therapy session is construed as a learning collaboration
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8998
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0306988021000025574
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Liverpool John Moores University
Psychology

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