Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8747

Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Plant mating systems in a changing world
Authors: Eckert, Christopher G
Kalisz, Susan
Geber, Monica A
Sargent, Risa D
Elle, Elizabeth
Cheptou, Pierre-Olivier
Goodwillie, Carol
Johnston, Mark O
Kelly, John K
Moeller, David A
Porcher, Emmanuelle
Ree, Richard H
Vallejo-Marin, Mario
Winn, Alice A
Contact Email: mario.vallejo@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jan-2010
Publisher: Cell Press
Citation: Eckert CG, Kalisz S, Geber MA, Sargent RD, Elle E, Cheptou P, Goodwillie C, Johnston MO, Kelly JK, Moeller DA, Porcher E, Ree RH, Vallejo-Marin M & Winn AA (2010) Plant mating systems in a changing world, Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 25 (1), pp. 35-43.
Abstract: There is increasing evidence that human disturbance can negatively impact plant–pollinator interactions such as outcross pollination. We present a meta-analysis of 22 studies involving 27 plant species showing a significant reduction in the proportion of seeds outcrossed in response to anthropogenic habitat modifications. We discuss the evolutionary consequences of disturbance on plant mating systems, and in particular whether reproductive assurance through selfing effectively compensates for reduced outcrossing. The extent to which disturbance reduces pollinator versus mate availability could generate diverse selective forces on reproductive traits. Investigating how anthropogenic change influences plant mating will lead to new opportunities for better understanding of how mating systems evolve, as well as of the ecological and evolutionary consequences of human activities and how to mitigate them.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8747
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2009.06.013
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Queen's University Kingston
University of Pittsburgh
Cornell University
University of Ottawa
Simon Fraser University
CEFE-CNRS, France
East Carolina University, USA
Dalhousie University
University of Kansas
University of Minnesota
University Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC)
Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago
Biological and Environmental Sciences
Florida State University

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