Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8726
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Type-D personality mechanisms of effect: The role of health-related behavior and social support
Authors: Williams, Lynn
O'Connor, Rory
Howard, Siobhan
Hughes, Brian M
Johnston, Derek W
Hay, Julia L
O'Connor, Daryl B
Lewis, Christopher A
Ferguson, Eamonn
Sheehy, Noel
Grealy, Madeleine A
O'Carroll, Ronan
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Adult
Adults
age
BEHAVIOR
British
C
Countries
Design
evidence
Female
Females
Health
HEALTH behavior
INDIVIDUALS
INHIBITION
INVESTIGATE
IRELAND
IRISH
LEVEL
levels
Male
MALES
MECHANISM
MECHANISMS
method
methods
Neuroticism
objective
other
patient
Patients
Personality
Population
Prevalence
PROGNOSIS
relationship
relationships
Role
social inhibition
Social support
support
Type D personality
United Kingdom
YOUNG adults
Issue Date: Jan-2008
Publisher: PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Citation: Williams L, O'Connor R, Howard S, Hughes BM, Johnston DW, Hay JL, O'Connor DB, Lewis CA, Ferguson E, Sheehy N, Grealy MA & O'Carroll R (2008) Type-D personality mechanisms of effect: The role of health-related behavior and social support, Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 64 (1), pp. 63-69.
Abstract: Objective: To (a) investigate the prevalence of type-D personality (the conjoint effects of negative affectivity and social inhibition) in a healthy British and Irish population; (b) to test the influence of type-D on health-related behavior, and (c) to determine if these relationships are explained by neuroticism. Methods: A cross-sectional design was employed; 1012 healthy young adults (225 males, 787 females, mean age 20.5 years) from the United Kingdom and Ireland completed measures of type-D personality, health behaviors, social support, and neuroticism. Results: The prevalence of type-D, was found to be 38.5%, significantly higher than that reported in other European countries. In addition, type-D individuals reported performing significantly fewer health-related behaviors and lower levels of social support than non-type-D individuals. These relationships remained significant after controlling for neuroticism. Conclusion: These findings provide new evidence on type-D and suggest a role for health-related behavior in explaining the link between type-D and poor clinical prognosis in cardiac patients.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8726
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2007.06.008
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Stirling
Psychology
National University of Ireland - Galway
National University of Ireland - Galway
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Leeds
Ulster University
University of Nottingham
Liverpool John Moores University
University of Strathclyde
Psychology

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