Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8700
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Suicidal thinking and perfectionism: The role of goal adjustment and behavioral inhibition/activation systems (BIS/BAS)
Authors: O'Connor, Rory
Forgan, Grant
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: 10
200
30
300
320
340
360
40
activation
Adjustment
Adolescence
ADULTHOOD
AFFILIATION
age
Antisocial Behavior
association
ASSOCIATIONS
BEHAVIOR
BEHAVIOR therapy
behavioral activation sensitivity
behavioral inhibition sensitivity
Behaviour
C
Classification
Cognitive Behavior Therapy
CONSTRUCT
DATABASE
DATE
disengagement
Disorders
empirical
Female
Future
General Health Questionnaire
goal adjustment
Goal Orientation
Health
IDEATION
implications
INHIBITION
language
location
Male
media
Methodology
MIDDLE
Middle Age
NUMBER
Orientation
other
PARTICIPANTS
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Perfectionism
Population
PSYCHOLOGY
Psycinfo
Quantitative Studies
quantitative study
QUESTIONNAIRE
RECORD
Regression
relationship
relationships
RELEASE
Research
rights
Role
SCALE
Scotland
Sensitivity
SERIES
Stirling
SUICIDAL behavior
suicidal behaviour
Suicidal ideation
suicidal thinking
Suicide
SYSTEM
Systems
TESTS
THERAPIES
THERAPY
Thinking
time
treatment
universities
Issue Date: Dec-2007
Publisher: Springer
Citation: O'Connor R & Forgan G (2007) Suicidal thinking and perfectionism: The role of goal adjustment and behavioral inhibition/activation systems (BIS/BAS), Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 25 (4), pp. 321-341.
Abstract: The current study investigated the associations among perfectionism, goal adjustment, behavioral activation sensitivity (BAS), behavioral inhibition sensitivity (BIS), and suicidal thinking. Participants (n = 255) completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the BIS/BAS scale, the Goal Adjustment scale, and a measure of suicidal thinking. The findings showed that socially prescribed perfectionism was the only perfectionism dimension associated with suicidal thinking. Goal reengagement (but not goal disengagement) is an important construct in the suicidal process. A series of hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal reengagement moderates and mediates the effect of socially prescribed perfectionism on suicidal thinking. BIS was also associated with suicidal behavior but its effect was mediated via socially prescribed perfectionism. The theoretical and treatment implications of the relationships between socially prescribed perfectionism, goal reengagement, and suicidal thinking and between BIS, socially prescribed perfectionism, and suicidal thinking are discussed. Future research is required to determine whether these relationships are predictive of suicidal thinking and behavior over time.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8700
URL: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=psyh&AN=2007-18332-005&site=ehost-live;ro2@stir.ac.uk
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10942-007-0057-2
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology
University of Stirling

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