Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8697
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Healthy ageing, perceived motor-efficacy, and performance on cognitively demanding action tasks
Authors: Potter, Lauren M
Grealy, Madeleine A
O'Connor, Rory
Contact Email: rory.oconnor@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: 10
300
80
ABILITY
academics
Adult
Adults
Aged
analysis
at risk
BELIEF
beliefs
CONFIDENCE
ERROR
ERRORS
factor analysis
functioning
Future
ILLNESS
INHIBITION
Intervention
Interventions
Interview
Interviews
LEVEL
levels
LIMITATIONS
older adults
other
PARTICIPANTS
Performance
RANGE
risk
SAMPLE
SCALE
TASK
Issue Date: Feb-2009
Publisher: BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOC
Citation: Potter LM, Grealy MA & O'Connor R (2009) Healthy ageing, perceived motor-efficacy, and performance on cognitively demanding action tasks, British Journal of Psychology, 100 (1), pp. 49-70.
Abstract: Current measures assessing older adults' functional ability detect existing limitations on essential tasks rather than changes in other aspects of functioning that could indicate future limitations. The perceived motor-efficacy scale was developed to measure capability beliefs of healthy older adults across a range of daily action tasks. Subscales were developed through interviews with older volunteers and academics, then administered to participants aged 60-96 (N = 300). Factor analysis of subscale scores produced 10 subscales. These demonstrated strong internal reliability, which was replicated with a second sample aged 60-92 (N = 167). The influence of perceived motor-efficacy on performance of cognitively demanding action tasks was investigated with a third sample aged 60-88 (N = 134). On a task assessing the inhibition of an inappropriate action, older adults in their 80s with high confidence produced minor errors, whereas those with lower confidence produced extreme errors. On another task assessing the ability to inhibit a previously learnt action, those with high levels of perceived motor-efficacy performed better amongst those least able to inhibit, but more poorly among those most able. Perceived motor-efficacy may therefore be useful in identifying older adults at risk of functional limitations and enabling interventions before the onset of illness.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8697
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/000712608X304478
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Heriot-Watt University
University of Strathclyde
Psychology

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