Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/847
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Social influence in human face preference: men and women are influenced more for long-term than short-term attractiveness decisions
Authors: Little, Anthony
Burriss, Robert
Jones, Benedict C
DeBruine, Lisa M
Caldwell, Christine Anna
Keywords: Faces
Copying
Term
Attractiveness
Issue Date: Mar-2008
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Little A, Burriss R, Jones BC, DeBruine LM & Caldwell CA (2008) Social influence in human face preference: men and women are influenced more for long-term than short-term attractiveness decisions, Evolution and Human Behavior, 29 (2), pp. 140-146.
Abstract: In non-human animals mate-choice copying has received much attention, with studies demonstrating that females tend to copy the choices of other females for specific males. Here we show, for both men and women, that pairing with an attractive partner increases the attractiveness of opposite-sex faces for long-term relationship decisions but not short-term decisions. Our study therefore shows social transmission of face preference in humans, which may have important consequences for the evolution of human traits. Our study also highlights the flexibility of human mate choice and suggests that, for humans, learning about non-physical traits that are important to pair-bonding drives copying-like behaviour.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/847
URL: http://www.ehbonline.org/home
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2007.11.007
Rights: Published in Evolution and Human Behavior by Elsevier.
Affiliation: Psychology
Psychology
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
Psychology

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