Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7177

Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Does cannibalism in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) reduce the risk of predation?
Authors: Chapman, Jason W
Williams, Trevor
Martinez, Ana-Mabel
Cisneros, Juan
Caballero, Primitivo
Cave, Ronald D
Goulson, Dave
Contact Email: dave.goulson@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Spodoptera frugiperda
Cannibalism
Predation
Parasitism
Issue Date: Sep-2000
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Chapman JW, Williams T, Martinez A, Cisneros J, Caballero P, Cave RD & Goulson D (2000) Does cannibalism in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) reduce the risk of predation?, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 48 (4), pp. 321- 327.
Abstract: The incidence of cannibalism of larval Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on maize under field conditions was investigated using field cages. Cannibalism was found to account for approximately 40% mortality when maize plants were infested with two or four fourth-instar larvae over a 3-day period. Field trials examined the effect of larval density on the prevalence of natural enemies of S. frugiperda. The abundance of predators (earwigs, staphylinids, other predatory beetles, and Chrysoperla spp.) was significantly greater on maize plants with higher levels of larval feeding damage, while the relationship between predator abundance and number of S. frugiperda larvae per plant was less clear. As larval damage is probably a more reliable indicator of previous larval density than numbers collected at an evaluation, this indicates that predation risk will be greater for larvae living in large groups. Parasitism accounted for 7.1% mortality of larvae in sorghum, and involved six species of Hymenoptera and Tachinidae. There was no effect of larval density or within-plant distribution on the probability of larval attack by parasitoids. The selective benefits of cannibalism, in relation to the risk of predation and parasitism, are discussed.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7177
URL: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=yv4JPVwI&eid=2-s2.0-0033832390&md5=1686e414e66bcb3764f9039f7b5e487a
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002650000237
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Southampton
ECOSUR, Mexico
ECOSUR, Mexico
ECOSUR, Mexico
University of Navarra
Escuela Agrı́cola Panamericana, Hondur
Biological and Environmental Sciences

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