Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/424
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Influence of video mediation on adult-child interviews:
Authors: Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth
McAuley, Sandra
Keywords: Child Witnesses
Communication
Live video Link
Issue Date: Aug-2000
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Citation: Doherty-Sneddon G & McAuley S (2000) Influence of video mediation on adult-child interviews:, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 14 (4), pp. 379-392.
Abstract: The impact of high bandwidth video links on children’s abilities to give evidence about a neutral event was investigated. Thirty-two six year olds and 32 ten year olds took part. Each child was interviewed by a trained adult either face-to-face or across a live video link. Face-to-face and video condition interviews did not differ in terms of: total correct information; relevant information given during narrative recall; or the style of questioning required. However significantly more incorrect information was given during specific questioning in the face-to-face interviews, and younger children were significantly more resistant to leading questions in the video condition. Some gestural information was lost in the video condition due to camera angles. Furthermore, older children produced more information during free narrative recall in face-to-face interviews. Positive effects of the video condition are interpreted as due to increasing social distance. Negative effects are associated with attenuation of visual cue
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/424
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1099-0720(200007/08)
Rights: The Publisher John Wiley & Sons does not allow external distribution of this Work, however authors can distribute a free copy to a colleague for the advancement of scholarly or scientific research or study, or for coroporate informational purposes. Therefore use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the STORRE record to request a copy directly from the author.; This is the author's final, refereed article. This is a preprint of an article published in Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol.14, issue 4, 379-392, 2000. The publisher version is available from the Wiley web site at: http://www.interscience.wiley.com
Affiliation: Psychology
University of Stirling

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