Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3324

Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Reduction of forest soil respiration in response to nitrogen deposition
Authors: Janssens, Ivan
Dieleman, Wouter
Luyssaert, Sebastiaan
Subke, Jens-Arne
Reichstein, Markus
Ceulemans, Reinhart
Ciais, Philippe
Dolman, A Johannes
Grace, John
Matteucci, Giorgio
Papale, Dario
Piao, Shi-Long
Schulze, Ernst-Detlef
Tang, Jianwu
Law, Beverly E
Contact Email: jens-arne.subke@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: NORTHERN HARDWOOD FORESTS
ATMOSPHERIC NITRATE DEPOSITION
ORGANIC-MATTER DECOMPOSITION
LITTER DECOMPOSITION
CARBON SEQUESTRATION
MICROBIAL BIOMASS
BOREAL FOREST
TEMPERATE FOREST
HUMIC SUBSTANCES
EUROPEAN FORESTS
Issue Date: May-2010
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Janssens I, Dieleman W, Luyssaert S, Subke J, Reichstein M, Ceulemans R, Ciais P, Dolman AJ, Grace J, Matteucci G, Papale D, Piao S, Schulze E, Tang J & Law BE (2010) Reduction of forest soil respiration in response to nitrogen deposition, Nature Geoscience, 3 (5), pp. 315-322.
Abstract: The use of fossil fuels and fertilizers has increased the amount of biologically reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere over the past century. As a consequence, forests in industrialized regions have experienced greater rates of nitrogen deposition in recent decades. This unintended fertilization has stimulated forest growth, but has also affected soil microbial activity, and thus the recycling of soil carbon and nutrients. A meta-analysis suggests that nitrogen deposition impedes organic matter decomposition, and thus stimulates carbon sequestration, in temperate forest soils where nitrogen is not limiting microbial growth. The concomitant reduction in soil carbon emissions is substantial, and equivalent in magnitude to the amount of carbon taken up by trees owing to nitrogen fertilization. As atmospheric nitrogen levels continue to rise, increased nitrogen deposition could spread to older, more weathered soils, as found in the tropics; however, soil carbon cycling in tropical forests cannot yet be assessed.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3324
URL: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ngeo844
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ngeo844
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Antwerp
University of Antwerp
LSCE CEA‑CNRS‑
Biological and Environmental Sciences
Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry, Germany
University of Antwerp
LSCE CEA‑CNRS‑
VU University Amsterdam
University of Edinburgh
CNR‑ISAF
University of Tuscia
Peking University
Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry, Germany
Marine Biological Laboratory
Oregon State University

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