Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/320
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Equally attending but still not seeing : an eye-tracking study of change detection in own- and other-race faces
Authors: Hirose, Yoriko
Hancock, Peter J B
Keywords: Change blindness
Other race
Eye-tracking
attention
Issue Date: Aug-2007
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: Hirose Y & Hancock PJB (2007) Equally attending but still not seeing : an eye-tracking study of change detection in own- and other-race faces, Visual Cognition, 15 (6), pp. 647-660.
Abstract: The present study aimed to investigate whether the faster change detection in own race faces in a change blindness paradigm, reported by Humphreys, Hodsoll and Campbell (2005, Visual Cognition, 12, 249-262) and explained in terms of people’s poorer ability to discriminate other race faces, may be explained by people’s preferential attention towards own race faces. The study by Humphreys et al. was replicated using the same stimuli, while participants’ eye movements were recorded. These revealed that there was no attentional bias towards own race faces (analysed in terms of fixation order, number and duration), but people still detected changes in own race faces faster than in other race faces. The current results therefore give further support for the original claim that people are less sensitive to changes made in other race faces, when own and other race faces are equally attended.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/320
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13506280601069578
Rights: Published in Visual Cognition by Taylor & Francis.; Images adapted from previous issue of same journal, with permission from Humphreys et al.
Affiliation: University of Stirling
Psychology

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