Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2837

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) respond to video images of themselves
Authors: Anderson, James
Kuroshima, Hika
Paukner, Annika
Fujita, Kazuo
Contact Email: j.r.anderson@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Capuchin
Video
Mirror
Self-recognition
Self-awareness
Visual preference
Facial expressions
Issue Date: Jan-2009
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Anderson J, Kuroshima H, Paukner A & Fujita K (2009) Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) respond to video images of themselves, Animal Cognition, 12 (1), pp. 55-62.
Abstract: Many studies have used mirror-image stimulation in attempts to find self-recognition in monkeys. However, very few studies have presented monkeys with video images of themselves; the present study is the first to do so with capuchin monkeys. Six tufted capuchin monkeys were individually exposed to live face-on and side-on video images of themselves (experimental Phase 1). Both video screens initially elicited considerable interest. Two adult males looked preferentially at their face-on image, whereas two adult females looked preferentially at their side-on image; the latter elicited lateral movements and head-cocking. Only males showed communicative facial expressions, which were directed towards the face-on screen. In Phase 2 monkeys discriminated between real-time, face-on images and identical images delayed by 1 s, with the adult females especially preferring real-time images. In this phase both screens elicited facial expressions, shown by all monkeys. In Phase 3 there was no evidence of discrimination between previously recorded video images of self and similar images of a familiar conspecific. Although they showed no signs of explicit self-recognition, the monkeys’ behaviour strongly suggests recognition of the correspondence between kinaesthetic information and external visual effects. In species such as humans and great apes, this type of self-awareness feeds into a system that gives rise to explicit self-recognition.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2837
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-008-0170-3
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology
University of Georgia
National Institutes of Health (US)
Kyoto University

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