Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26287
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Investigating the Functional Utility of the Left Parietal ERP Old/New Effect: Brain Activity Predicts Within but Not Between Participant Variance in Episodic Recollection
Authors: MacLeod, Catherine A
Donaldson, David
Keywords: episodic memory
event-related potential (ERP)
individual differences
left parietal effect
recollection
Issue Date: 5-Dec-2017
Citation: MacLeod CA & Donaldson D (2017) Investigating the Functional Utility of the Left Parietal ERP Old/New Effect: Brain Activity Predicts Within but Not Between Participant Variance in Episodic Recollection, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11, Art. No.: 580.
Abstract: A success story within neuroimaging has been the discovery of distinct neural correlates of episodic retrieval, providing insight into the processes that support memory for past life events. Here we focus on one commonly reported neural correlate, the left parietal old/new effect, a positive going modulation seen in Event-Related Potential (ERP) data that is widely considered to index episodic recollection. Substantial evidence links changes in the size of the left parietal effect to changes in remembering, but the precise functional utility of the effect remains unclear. Here, using forced choice recognition, we present a novel population level test of the hypothesis that the magnitude of the left parietal effect correlates with memory performance. We recorded ERPs in two large samples of healthy young adults, and successfully replicated existing within participant modulations of the magnitude of the left parietal effect with recollection. Critically, however, both datasets also show that across participants the magnitude of the left parietal effect does not correlate with behavioural measures of memory - including both subjective and objective estimates of recollection. We conclude that across participants, and tasks, variability in the magnitude of the left parietal old/new effect cannot be used to infer differences in memory. Taken together, these novel findings provide important constraints on the functional interpretation of the left parietal effect, suggesting that differences in the magnitude of old/new effects found between groups cannot be used to infer differences in recollection.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00580
Rights: © 2017 Macleod and Donaldson. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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