Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25988
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Phase 2 of CATALISE: a multinational and multidisciplinary Delphi consensus study of problems with language development: Terminology
Authors: McCartney, Elspeth
Bishop, Dorothy V M
Snowling, Margaret J
Thompson, Paul A
Greenhalgh, Trisha
Keywords: Developmental language disorder
specific language impairment
terminology
risk factors
definitions
Issue Date: Oct-2017
Citation: McCartney E, Bishop DVM, Snowling MJ, Thompson PA & Greenhalgh T (2017) Phase 2 of CATALISE: a multinational and multidisciplinary Delphi consensus study of problems with language development: Terminology, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 58 (10), pp. 1068-1080.
Abstract: Background: Lack of agreement about criteria and terminology for children?s language problems affects access to services as well as hindering research and practice. We report the second phase of a study using an online Delphi method to address these issues. In the first phase, we focused on criteria for language disorder. Here we consider terminology.  Methods: The Delphi method is an iterative process in which an initial set of statements is rated by a panel of experts, who then have the opportunity to view anonymised ratings from other panel members. On this basis they can either revise their views or make a case for their position. The statements are then revised based on panel feedback, and again rated by and commented on by the panel. In this study, feedback from a second round was used to prepare a final set of statements in narrative form. The panel included 57 individuals representing a range of professions and nationalities.  Results: We achieved at least 78\% agreement for 19 of 21 statements within two rounds of ratings. The term ?Language Disorder? is recommended to refer to a profile of difficulties that causes functional impairment in everyday life and is associated with poor prognosis. The term, ?Developmental Language Disorder? (DLD) was endorsed for use when the language disorder was not associated with a known biomedical aetiology. It was also agreed that (1) presence of risk factors (neurobiological or environmental) does not preclude a diagnosis of DLD, (2) DLD can co-occur with other neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., ADHD), and (3) DLD does not require a mismatch between verbal and nonverbal ability.  Conclusions: This Delphi exercise highlights reasons for disagreements about terminology for language disorders and proposes standard definitions and nomenclature
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12721
Rights: © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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