Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25775
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: How do episodic memory and semantic memory contribute to episodic foresight in young children?
Authors: Martin-Ordas, Gema
Atance, Cristina M.
Caza, Julian
Keywords: episodic memory
semantic memory
episodic foresight
children
developmental psychology
Issue Date: 8-Jul-2014
Citation: Martin-Ordas G, Atance CM & Caza J (2014) How do episodic memory and semantic memory contribute to episodic foresight in young children?, Frontiers in Psychology, 5, Art. No.: 732.
Abstract: Humans are able to transcend the present and mentally travel to another time, place, or perspective. Mentally projecting ourselves backwards (i.e., episodic memory) or forwards (i.e., episodic foresight) in time are crucial characteristics of the human memory system. Indeed, over the past few years, episodic memory has been argued to be involved both in our capacity to retrieve our personal past experiences and in our ability to imagine and foresee future scenarios. However, recent theory and findings suggest that semantic memory also plays a significant role in imagining future scenarios. We draw on Tulving’s definition of episodic and semantic memory to provide a critical analysis of their role in episodic foresight tasks described in the developmental literature. We conclude by suggesting future directions of research that could further our understanding of how both episodic memory and semantic memory are intimately connected to episodic foresight.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00732
Rights: © 2014 Martin-Ordas, Atance and Caza. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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