Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25686
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Resistance exercise initiates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) translocation and protein complex co-localisation in human skeletal muscle
Authors: Song, Zhe
Moore, Daniel R
Hodson, Nathan
Ward, Carl
Dent, Jessica R
O'Leary, Mary F
Shaw, Andy
Hamilton, David Lee
Sarkar, Sovan
Gangloff, Yann-Gael
Hornberger, Troy A
Spriet, Lawrence L
Heigenhauser, George J F
Philp, Andrew
Keywords: cell biology
TOR signalling
Issue Date: 10-Jul-2017
Citation: Song Z, Moore DR, Hodson N, Ward C, Dent JR, O'Leary MF, Shaw A, Hamilton DL, Sarkar S, Gangloff Y, Hornberger TA, Spriet LL, Heigenhauser GJF & Philp A (2017) Resistance exercise initiates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) translocation and protein complex co-localisation in human skeletal muscle, Scientific Reports, 7, Art. No.: 14.
Abstract: The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central mediator of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. We utilized immunofluorescence approaches to study mTOR cellular distribution and protein-protein co-localisation in human skeletal muscle in the basal state as well as immediately, 1 and 3 h after an acute bout of resistance exercise in a fed (FED; 20 g Protein/40 g carbohydrate/1 g fat) or energy-free control (CON) state. mTOR and the lysosomal protein LAMP2 were highly co-localised in basal samples. Resistance exercise resulted in rapid translocation of mTOR/LAMP2 towards the cell membrane. Concurrently, resistance exercise led to the dissociation of TSC2 from Rheb and increased in the co-localisation of mTOR and Rheb post exercise in both FED and CON. In addition, mTOR co-localised with Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit F (eIF3F) at the cell membrane post-exercise in both groups, with the response significantly greater at 1 h of recovery in the FED compared to CON. Collectively our data demonstrate that cellular trafficking of mTOR occurs in human muscle in response to an anabolic stimulus, events that appear to be primarily influenced by muscle contraction. The translocation and association of mTOR with positive regulators (i.e. Rheb and eIF3F) is consistent with an enhanced mRNA translational capacity after resistance exercise.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-05483-x
Rights: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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