Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25565
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Using ecosystem engineers as tools in habitat restoration and rewilding: beaver and wetlands
Authors: Law, Alan
Gaywood, Martin
Jones, Kevin
Ramsay, Paul
Willby, Nigel
Contact Email: n.j.willby@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Castor fiber
Agriculture
species richness
diversity
grazing
exclosure
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2017
Citation: Law A, Gaywood M, Jones K, Ramsay P & Willby N (2017) Using ecosystem engineers as tools in habitat restoration and rewilding: beaver and wetlands, Science of the Total Environment, 605-606, pp. 1021-1030.
Abstract: Potential for habitat restoration is increasingly used as an argument for reintroducing ecosystem engineers. Beaver have well known effects on hydromorphology through dam construction, but their scope to restore wetland biodiversity in areas degraded by agriculture is largely inferred. Our study presents the first formal monitoring of a planned beaver-assisted restoration, focussing on changes in vegetation over 12 years within an agriculturally-degraded fen following beaver release, based on repeated sampling of fixed plots. Effects are compared to ungrazed exclosures which allowed the wider influence of waterlogging to be separated from disturbance through tree felling and herbivory. After 12 years of beaver presence mean plant species richness had increased on average by 46% per plot, while the cumulative number of species recorded increased on average by 148%. Heterogeneity, measured by dissimilarity of plot composition, increased on average by 71%. Plants associated with high moisture and light conditions increased significantly in coverage, whereas species indicative of high nitrogen decreased. Areas exposed to both grazing and waterlogging generally showed the most pronounced change in composition, with effects of grazing seemingly additive, but secondary, to those of waterlogging.  Our study illustrates that a well-known ecosystem engineer, the beaver, can with time transform agricultural land into a comparatively species-rich and heterogeneous wetland environment, thus meeting common restoration objectives. This offers a passive but innovative solution to the problems of wetland habitat loss that complements the role of beavers in water or sediment storage and flow attenuation. The role of larger herbivores has been significantly overlooked in our understanding of freshwater ecosystem function; the use of such species may yet emerge as the missing ingredient in successful restoration.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.06.173
Rights: © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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