Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25549
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Assessing Africa-wide pangolin exploitation by scaling local data (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Ingram, Daniel J
Coad, Lauren M
Abernethy, Katharine
Maisels, Fiona
Stokes, Emma
Bobo, Kadiri S
Breuer, Thomas
Gandiwa, Edson
Ghiurghi, Andrea
Greengrass, Elizabeth
Holmern, Tomas
Kamgaing, Towa O W
Ndong, Obiang Anne Marie
Poulsen, John R
Schleicher, Judith
Contact Email: k.a.abernethy@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Africa
Hunting
Market
OFFTAKE
Pangolins
Trade
Wild meat
Issue Date: 11-Jul-2017
Citation: Ingram DJ, Coad LM, Abernethy K, Maisels F, Stokes E, Bobo KS, Breuer T, Gandiwa E, Ghiurghi A, Greengrass E, Holmern T, Kamgaing TOW, Ndong Obiang AM, Poulsen JR & Schleicher J (2017) Assessing Africa-wide pangolin exploitation by scaling local data (Forthcoming/Available Online), Conservation Letters.
Abstract: Overexploitation is one of the main pressures driving wildlife closer to extinction, yet broad-scale data to evaluate species’ declines are limited. Using African pangolins (Family: Pholidota) as a case study, we demonstrate that collating local-scale data can provide crucial information on regional trends in exploitation of threatened species to inform conservation actions and policy. We estimate that 0.4-2.7 million pangolins are hunted annually in Central African forests. The number of pangolins hunted has increased by ~150% and the proportion of pangolins of all vertebrates hunted increased from 0.04% to 1.83% over the past four decades. However, there were no trends in pangolins observed at markets, suggesting use of alternative supply chains. We found evidence that the price of giant (Smutsia gigantea) and arboreal (Phataginus sp.) pangolins in urban markets has increased, mirroring trends in Asian pangolins. Efforts and resources are needed to increase law enforcement and population monitoring, and investigate linkages between subsistence hunting and illegal wildlife trade.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/conl.12389
Rights: © 2017 The Authors. Conservation Letters published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Notes: Additional co-authors: Martin R. Nielsen, Hilary Solly, Carrie L. Vath, Matthias Waltert, Charlotte E. L. Whitham, David S. Wilkie, Jӧrn P.W. Scharlemann

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