Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24871
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The database of the PREDICTS (Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems) project
Authors: Hudson, Lawrence N
Newbold, Tim
Contu, Sara
Hill, Samantha L L
Lysenko, Igor
De, Palma Adriana
Phillips, Helena R P
Alhusseini, Tamera I
Bedford, Felicity E
Bennett, Dominic J
Booth, Hollie
Burton, Victoria J
Chng, Charlotte W T
Choimes, Argyrios
Kirkpatrick, Lucinda
Contact Email: lucinda.kirkpatrick@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: data sharing
global biodiversity modeling
global change
habitat destruction
land use
Issue Date: Jan-2017
Citation: Hudson LN, Newbold T, Contu S, Hill SLL, Lysenko I, De Palma A, Phillips HRP, Alhusseini TI, Bedford FE, Bennett DJ, Booth H, Burton VJ, Chng CWT, Choimes A & Kirkpatrick L (2017) The database of the PREDICTS (Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems) project, Ecology and Evolution, 7 (1), pp. 145-188.
Abstract: The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used this evidence base to develop global and regional statistical models of how local biodiversity responds to these measures. We describe and make freely available this 2016 release of the database, containing more than 3.2 million records sampled at over 26,000 locations and representing over 47,000 species. We outline how the database can help in answering a range of questions in ecology and conservation biology. To our knowledge, this is the largest and most geographically and taxonomically representative database of spatial comparisons of biodiversity that has been collated to date; it will be useful to researchers and international efforts wishing to model and understand the global status of biodiversity.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2579
Rights: © 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Notes: For full listing of authors see: https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2579

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