Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24507
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Forest diversity promotes individual tree growth in central European forest stands
Authors: Chamagne, Juliette
Tanadini, Matteo
Frank, David
Matula, Radim
Paine, C E Timothy
Philipson, Christopher D
Svatek, Martin
Turnbull, Lindsay A
Volarik, Daniel
Hector, Andy
Contact Email: c.e.t.paine@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: biodiversity
dendrochronology
ecological services
ecosystem functioning
forest productivity
tree growth rates
tree rings
Issue Date: Feb-2017
Citation: Chamagne J, Tanadini M, Frank D, Matula R, Paine CET, Philipson CD, Svatek M, Turnbull LA, Volarik D & Hector A (2017) Forest diversity promotes individual tree growth in central European forest stands, Journal of Applied Ecology, 54 (1), pp. 71-79.
Abstract: * Most experimental evidence on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning comes from ecosystems with fast-growing plants, such as grasslands. Although forests provide essential ecological services, they have been less well investigated.  * We used dendrochronology to compare the tree radial growth rates of four important timber species in replicated, spatially mapped stands that differed in tree composition and diversity within a central European managed forest.  * Growth rates differed among species but were largely unaffected by the density of neighbouring trees.  * Increasing stand diversity enhanced individual growth rates, after accounting for the effects of tree density and size. These increases were statistically indistinguishable among the four species. In contrast, the effects of stand and neighbourhood species composition on growth rates were non-significant.  * Policy implications. Our study of long-established central European forest stands revealed levels of tree diversity can be increased in managed forests, with the potential for modest increases in tree growth rates. These results suggest that in addition to the biodiversity and risk mitigation benefits associated with shifting practices away from monoculture management, increased carbon sequestration and yields in mature forests are likely to be realized. Our results suggest that it is possible to increase forest diversity with little or no costs to production and even with the potential for modest increases in tree growth rates.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12783
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Chamagne, J., Tanadini, M., Frank, D., Matula, R., Paine, C. E. T., Philipson, C. D., Svátek, M., Turnbull, L. A., Volařík, D. and Hector, A. (2017), Forest diversity promotes individual tree growth in central European forest stands. J Appl Ecol, 54: 71–79, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12783. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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