Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24210
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Solving the border control problem: Evidence of enhanced face matching in individuals with extraordinary face recognition skills
Authors: Bobak, Anna Katarzyna
Dowsett, Andrew James
Bate, Sarah
Contact Email: a.k.bobak@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: case study
clinical article
controlled study
facial recognition
human
identity
model
normal human
population based case control study
Issue Date: 1-Feb-2016
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Bobak AK, Dowsett AJ & Bate S (2016) Solving the border control problem: Evidence of enhanced face matching in individuals with extraordinary face recognition skills, PLoS ONE, 11 (2), Art. No.: e0148148.
Abstract: Photographic identity documents (IDs) are commonly used despite clear evidence that unfamiliar face matching is a difficult and error-prone task. The current study set out to examine the performance of seven individuals with extraordinary face recognition memory, so called "super recognisers" (SRs), on two face matching tasks resembling border control identity checks. In Experiment 1, the SRs as a group outperformed control participants on the "Glasgow Face Matching Test", and some case-by-case comparisons also reached significance. In Experiment 2, a perceptually difficult face matching task was used: the "Models Face Matching Test". Once again, SRs outperformed controls both on group and mostly in case-by-case analyses. These findings suggest that SRs are considerably better at face matching than typical perceivers, and would make proficient personnel for border control agencies. © 2016 Bobak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24210
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0148148
Rights: © 2016 Bobak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Affiliation: Psychology
University of Aberdeen
Bournemouth University

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