Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23761
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Is being resolute better than being pragmatic when it comes to breastfeeding? Longitudinal qualitative study investigating experiences of women intending to breastfeed using the Theoretical Domains Framework (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Jardine, Ellen E
McLellan, Julie
Dombrowski, Stephan U
Contact Email: s.u.dombrowski@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: breastfeeding
Theoretical Domains Framework
qualitative
longitudinal
pregnant women
interviews
Issue Date: 29-Jul-2016
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Citation: Jardine EE, McLellan J & Dombrowski SU Is being resolute better than being pragmatic when it comes to breastfeeding? Longitudinal qualitative study investigating experiences of women intending to breastfeed using the Theoretical Domains Framework (Forthcoming/Available Online), Journal of Public Health.
Abstract: Background  In the UK, initiating then discontinuing breastfeeding before two weeks post-partum is common. The aim of this longitudinal qualitative study was to explore which psychosocial factors may influence discontinuation.  Methods  A sample of 10 pregnant women intending to breastfeed were recruited. A longitudinal qualitative design was used to capture views prior to and two weeks following birth. Semi-structured interviews were conducted underpinned by the Theoretical Domains Framework to explore a comprehensive list of psychosocial factors.  Results  Four women discontinued breastfeeding at the time of the second interview. Pre partum differences were identified between maintainers and discontinuers; discontinuers appeared to have stronger intentions to breastfeed based on their self-determination, self-confidence and perception of fewer barriers to breastfeeding. Post partum, discontinuers highlighted how they felt physically unable to carry on; their feeding experiences elicited negative emotions and pain. Negative emotions appeared to be exacerbated by original breastfeeding beliefs and advice given by healthcare professionals.  Conclusions  The women in this study who discontinued breastfeeding showed less cognitive flexibility which appeared to exacerbate post partum emotional distress when they encountered difficulties. Women with strong intentions and self-determination might benefit from support in anticipating potential barriers and identifying ways of overcoming them.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23761
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdw073
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Public Health following peer review. The version of record [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here]
Affiliation: NHS Dumfries & Galloway
Psychology
Psychology

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