Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23367
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Increasing Patient Involvement in the Diabetic Foot Pathway: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial
Authors: McBride, Emily
Hacking, Belinda
O'Carroll, Ronan
Young, Matthew
Jahr, Jessica
Borthwick, Claire
Callander, Alana
Berrada, Zaynab
Contact Email: ronan.ocarroll@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Nov-2016
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell for Diabetes UK
Citation: McBride E, Hacking B, O'Carroll R, Young M, Jahr J, Borthwick C, Callander A & Berrada Z (2016) Increasing Patient Involvement in the Diabetic Foot Pathway: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial, Diabetic Medicine, 33 (11), pp. 1483-1492.
Abstract: Aims  This pilot study aimed to explore whether the use of an intervention to increase shared decision-making (Decision Navigation) increased decision self-efficacy and foot-treatment adherence in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.  Methods  Fifty-six patients with a diabetic foot ulcer were randomized to receive Decision Navigation (N= 30) or usual care (N= 26). Primary outcomes included decision self-efficacy, adherence to foot treatment as reported by the participant and adherence to foot treatment as reported by the clinician. Secondary outcomes included foot ulcer healing rate, health-related quality of life, decision conflict and decision regret.  Results  Despite participants rating Decision Navigation as very helpful, mixed analyses of variance revealed no differences in decision self-efficacy or adherence between those receiving Decision Navigation and those receiving usual care. There were no differences between groups with regards to the secondary outcomes, with the exception of decision conflict which increased over time (12 weeks) for those receiving Decision Navigation.  Conclusions  An intervention that facilitated patient involvement in treatment decisions did not have any impact on decisional confidence or adherence to foot treatment. This does not provide support for the suggestion that personalized care can improve health-related outcomes at this progressed stage of the patient's disease trajectory. We suggest that the diabetic foot population may benefit from interventions aimed at increasing motivation to engage with care pathways, centred on challenging personal controllability beliefs.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23367
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.13158
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: McBride E, Hacking B, O'Carroll R, Young M, Jahr J, Borthwick C, Callander A & Berrada Z (2016) Increasing Patient Involvement in the Diabetic Foot Pathway: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial, Diabetic Medicine, 33 (11), pp. 1483-1492, which has been published in final form at http://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13158. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
Affiliation: NHS Lothian
NHS Lothian
Psychology
NHS Lothian
NHS Lothian
NHS Lothian
NHS Lothian
NHS Lothian

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