Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Pain and self-harm: A systematic review (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Kirtley, Olivia J
O'Carroll, Ronan
O'Connor, Rory C
Contact Email:
Keywords: Self-harm
Non-suicidal self-injury
Issue Date: 31-May-2016
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Kirtley OJ, O'Carroll R & O'Connor RC Pain and self-harm: A systematic review (Forthcoming/Available Online), Journal of Affective Disorders.
Abstract: Background  A growing body of research has explored altered physical pain threshold and tolerance in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal self-harm. The evidence, however, is inconsistent such that the nature of the relationship is unclear, and whether or not this effect is also present in suicidal self-harm is equivocal.  Methods  A keyword search of three major psychological and medical databases (PsycINFO, Medline and Web of Knowledge) was conducted, yielding 1,873 records. Following duplicate removal and screening, 25 articles were quality assessed, and included in the final systematic review.  Results  There is strong evidence for increased pain tolerance in NSSI, and some evidence for this in suicidal individuals, but notably, there were no prospective studies. The review found a lack of substantive focus on psychological correlates of altered pain tolerance in this population. Several candidate explanatory mechanisms were proposed within the reviewed studies.  Limitations  The current review was a narrative systematic review; methods used to assess pain were considered too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis.  Conclusions  The evidence suggests that there is elevated pain tolerance among those who engage in NSSI. Future prospective research should determine if altered pain tolerance is a cause or a consequence of the behaviour. The identification of psychological correlates of increased pain tolerance is a neglected area of research. It could provide opportunities for treatment/intervention development, if mediating or moderating pathways can be identified. Too few studies have directly investigated candidate explanatory mechanisms to draw definitive conclusions.
Type: Journal Article
DOI Link:
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
PainSH_Review_JAD_220416_ACCEPTED.pdf751.93 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 29/5/2019     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.