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Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis: global perspectives on invasion history and ecology
Authors: Murray, Katie M
Brown, Peter M J
Adriaens, Tim
Berkvens, Nick
Borges, Isabel
Clusella-Trullas, Susana
Comont, Richard F
De, Clercq Patrick
Eschen, Rene
Estoup, Arnaud
Evans, Edward W
Facon, Benoit
Gardiner, Mary M
Roy, Helen E
Tinsley, M C
Contact Email:
Keywords: Coccinellidae
Species traits
Competitive interactions
Invasion history
Issue Date: Apr-2016
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Murray KM, Brown PMJ, Adriaens T, Berkvens N, Borges I, Clusella-Trullas S, Comont RF, De Clercq P, Eschen R, Estoup A, Evans EW, Facon B, Gardiner MM, Roy HE & Tinsley MC (2016) The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis: global perspectives on invasion history and ecology, Biological Invasions, 18 (4), pp. 977-1044.
Abstract: The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is native to Asia but has been intentionally introduced to many countries as a biological control agent of pest insects. In numerous countries, however, it has been introduced unintentionally. The dramatic spread of H. axyridis within many countries has been met with considerable trepidation. It is a generalist top predator, able to thrive in many habitats and across wide climatic conditions. It poses a threat to biodiversity, particularly aphidophagous insects, through competition and predation, and in many countries adverse effects have been reported on other species, particularly coccinellids. However, the patterns are not consistent around the world and seem to be affected by many factors including landscape and climate. Research on H. axyridis has provided detailed insights into invasion biology from broad patterns and processes to approaches in surveillance and monitoring. An impressive number of studies on this alien species have provided mechanistic evidence alongside models explaining large-scale patterns and processes. The involvement of citizens in monitoring this species in a number of countries around the world is inspiring and has provided data on scales that would be otherwise unachievable. Harmonia axyridis has successfully been used as a model invasive alien species and has been the inspiration for global collaborations at various scales. There is considerable scope to expand the research and associated collaborations, particularly to increase the breadth of parallel studies conducted in the native and invaded regions. Indeed a qualitative comparison of biological traits across the native and invaded range suggests that there are differences which ultimately could influence the population dynamics of this invader. Here we provide an overview of the invasion history and ecology of H. axyridis globally with consideration of future research perspectives. We reflect broadly on the contributions of such research to our understanding of invasion biology while also informing policy and people.  Additional co-authors: Artur Gil, Audrey A. Grez, Thomas Guillemaud, Danny Haelewaters, Annette Herz, Alois Honek, Andy G. Howe, Cang Hui, William D. Hutchison, Marc Kenis, Robert L. Koch, Jan Kulfan, Lori Lawson Handley, Eric Lombaert, Antoon Loomans, John Losey, Alexander O. Lukashuk, Dirk Maes, Alexandra Magro, Gilles San Martin, Zdenka Martinkova, Ingrid A. Minnaar, Oldřich Nedved, Marina J. Orlova-Bienkowskaja, Naoya Osawa, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Hans Peter Ravn, Gabriele Rondoni, Steph L. Rorke, Sergey K. Ryndevich, May-Guri Saethre, John J. Sloggett, Antonio Onofre Soares, Riaan Stals, Axel Vandereycken, Paul van Wielink, Sandra Viglášová, Peter Zach, Ilya A. Zakharov, Tania Zaviezo, Zihua Zhao
Type: Journal Article
DOI Link:
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository. Published in Biological Invasions, April 2016, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 997-1044 by Springer International. The final publication is available at Springer via
Affiliation: University of Stirling
Anglia Ruskin University
Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO)
Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO)
University of the Azores
University of Stellenbosch, South Africa
Bumblebee Conservation Trust
Ghent University
Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI)
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique
Utah State University
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique
Ohio State University
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH)
Biological and Environmental Sciences

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