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Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Protein considerations for optimising skeletal muscle mass in healthy young and older adults
Authors: Witard, Oliver
Wardle, Sophie
Macnaughton, Lindsay S
Hodgson, Adrian B
Tipton, Kevin
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Keywords: Muscle protein synthesis
muscle hypertrophy
amino acid availability
protein source
protein dose
protein timing
protein pattern
macronutrient coingestion
Issue Date: Mar-2016
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Witard O, Wardle S, Macnaughton LS, Hodgson AB & Tipton K (2016) Protein considerations for optimising skeletal muscle mass in healthy young and older adults, Nutrients, 8 (4), Art. No.: 181.
Abstract: Skeletal muscle is critical for human health. Protein feeding, alongside resistance exercise, is a potent stimulus for muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and is a key factor that regulates skeletal muscle mass (SMM). The main purpose of this narrative review was to evaluate the latest evidence for optimising the amino acid or protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion for increasing or preserving SMM in healthy young and healthy older adults. We used a systematic search strategy of PubMed and Web of Science to retrieve all articles related to this review objective. In summary, our findings support the notion that protein guidelines for increasing or preserving SMM are more complex than simply recommending a total daily amount of protein. Instead, multifactorial interactions between protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion, alongside exercise, influence the stimulation of MPS, and thus should be considered in the context of protein recommendations for regulating SMM. To conclude, on the basis of currently available scientific literature, protein recommendations for optimising SMM should be tailored to the population or context of interest, with consideration given to age and resting/post resistance exercise conditions.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons by Attribution (CC-BY) license (
Affiliation: Sport
University of Stirling
Lucozade Ribena Suntory Ltd

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