Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22807
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Fine-scale genetic structure and cryptic associations reveal evidence of kin-based sociality in the African forest elephant
Authors: Schuttler, Stephanie G
Philbrick, Jessica A
Jeffery, Kathryn Jane
Eggert, Lori S
Contact Email: kathryn.jeffery1@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 5-Feb-2014
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Schuttler SG, Philbrick JA, Jeffery KJ & Eggert LS (2014) Fine-scale genetic structure and cryptic associations reveal evidence of kin-based sociality in the African forest elephant, PLoS ONE, 9 (2), Art. No.: e88074.
Abstract: Spatial patterns of relatedness within animal populations are important in the evolution of mating and social systems, and have the potential to reveal information on species that are difficult to observe in the wild. This study examines the fine-scale genetic structure and connectivity of groups within African forest elephants,Loxodonta cyclotis, which are often difficult to observe due to forest habitat. We tested the hypothesis that genetic similarity will decline with increasing geographic distance, as we expect kin to be in closer proximity, using spatial autocorrelation analyses and Tau Krtests. Associations between individuals were investigated through a non-invasive genetic capture-recapture approach using network models, and were predicted to be more extensive than the small groups found in observational studies, similar to fission-fusion sociality found in African savanna (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) species. Dung samples were collected in Lopé National Park, Gabon in 2008 and 2010 and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci, genetically sexed, and sequenced at the mitochondrial DNA control region. We conducted analyses on samples collected at three different temporal scales: a day, within six-day sampling sessions, and within each year. Spatial autocorrelation and Tau Krtests revealed genetic structure, but results were weak and inconsistent between sampling sessions. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in distance classes of 0–5 km, and was strongest for the single day session. Despite weak genetic structure, individuals within groups were significantly more related to each other than to individuals between groups. Social networks revealed some components to have large, extensive groups of up to 22 individuals, and most groups were composed of individuals of the same matriline. Although fine-scale population genetic structure was weak, forest elephants are typically found in groups consisting of kin and based on matrilines, with some individuals having more associates than observed from group sizes alone.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22807
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0088074
Rights: © 2014 Schuttler et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Affiliation: University of Missouri - Columbia
University of Missouri - Columbia
Biological and Environmental Sciences
University of Missouri - Columbia

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