Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22658
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Decision-level adaptation in motion perception
Authors: Mather, George
Sharman, Rebecca J
Contact Email: rebecca.sharman@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: motion adaptation
implied motion
response bias
normalisation
Issue Date: 2-Dec-2015
Publisher: The Royal Society
Citation: Mather G & Sharman RJ (2015) Decision-level adaptation in motion perception, Royal Society Open Science, 2 (12), Art. No.: 150418.
Abstract: Prolonged exposure to visual stimuli causes a bias in observers' responses to subsequent stimuli. Such adaptation-induced biases are usually explained in terms of changes in the relative activity of sensory neurons in the visual system which respond selectively to the properties of visual stimuli. However, the bias could also be due to a shift in the observer's criterion for selecting one response rather than the alternative; adaptation at the decision level of processing rather than the sensory level. We investigated whether adaptation to implied motion is best attributed to sensory-level or decision-level bias. Three experiments sought to isolate decision factors by changing the nature of the participants' task while keeping the sensory stimulus unchanged. Results showed that adaptation-induced bias in reported stimulus direction only occurred when the participants' task involved a directional judgement, and disappeared when adaptation was measured using a non-directional task (reporting where motion was present in the display, regardless of its direction). We conclude that adaptation to implied motion is due to decision-level bias, and that a propensity towards such biases may be widespread in sensory decision-making.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22658
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.150418
Rights: © 2015 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
Affiliation: University of Lincoln
Psychology

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Mather2015.pdf409.67 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.