Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22567
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Quantifying the short-term costs of conservation interventions for fishers at Lake Alaotra, Madagascar
Authors: Wallace, Andrea P C
Milner-Gulland, Eleanor J
Jones, Julia P G
Bunnefeld, Nils
Young, Richard
Nicholson, Emily
Contact Email: nils.bunnefeld@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 24-Jun-2015
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Wallace APC, Milner-Gulland EJ, Jones JPG, Bunnefeld N, Young R & Nicholson E (2015) Quantifying the short-term costs of conservation interventions for fishers at Lake Alaotra, Madagascar, PLoS ONE, 10 (6), Art. No.: e0129440.
Abstract: Artisanal fisheries are a key source of food and income for millions of people, but if poorly managed, fishing can have declining returns as well as impacts on biodiversity. Management interventions such as spatial and temporal closures can improve fishery sustainability and reduce environmental degradation, but may carry substantial short-term costs for fishers. The Lake Alaotra wetland in Madagascar supports a commercially important artisanal fishery and provides habitat for a Critically Endangered primate and other endemic wildlife of conservation importance. Using detailed data from more than 1,600 fisher catches, we used linear mixed effects models to explore and quantify relationships between catch weight, effort, and spatial and temporal restrictions to identify drivers of fisher behaviour and quantify the potential effect of fishing restrictions on catch. We found that restricted area interventions and fishery closures would generate direct short-term costs through reduced catch and income, and these costs vary between groups of fishers using different gear. Our results show that conservation interventions can have uneven impacts on local people with different fishing strategies. This information can be used to formulate management strategies that minimise the adverse impacts of interventions, increase local support and compliance, and therefore maximise conservation effectiveness.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22567
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0129440
Rights: © 2015 Wallace et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Affiliation: Imperial College London
Imperial College London
Bangor University
Biological and Environmental Sciences
Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust
Imperial College London

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