Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22167
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Successful behavioural strategies to increase physical activity and improve glucose control in adults with Type 2 diabetes
Authors: Avery, Leah
Flynn, Darren
Dombrowski, Stephan U
van, Wersch Anna
Sniehotta, Falko F
Trenell, Michael I
Contact Email: s.u.dombrowski@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Aug-2015
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Avery L, Flynn D, Dombrowski SU, van Wersch A, Sniehotta FF & Trenell MI (2015) Successful behavioural strategies to increase physical activity and improve glucose control in adults with Type 2 diabetes, Diabetic Medicine, 32 (8), pp. 1058-1062.
Abstract: Aims: To explore which behaviour change techniques and other intervention features are associated with increased levels of physical activity and improved HbA1c in adults with Type2 diabetes. Methods: Moderator analyses were performed on a dataset of 21 behaviour change techniques and six intervention features identified in a systematic review of behavioural interventions (N=1975 patients with Type2 diabetes) to establish their associations with changes in physical activity and HbA1c. Results: Four behaviour change techniques (prompt focus on past success, barrier identification/problem-solving, use of follow-up prompts and provide information on where and when to perform physical activity) had statistically significant associations with increased levels of physical activity. Prompt review of behavioural goals and provide information on where and when to perform physical activity behaviour had statistically significant associations with improved HbA1c. Pedometer use was associated with decreased levels of physical activity. Conclusions: These data suggest that clinical care teams can optimise their consultations by incorporating specific behaviour change techniques that are associated with increased levels of physical activity and improved long-term glycaemic control.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22167
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.12738
Rights: © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Affiliation: Newcastle University
University of Stirling
Psychology
University of Teesside
Newcastle University
Newcastle University

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