Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22166
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Are interventions for low-income groups effective in changing healthy eating, physical activity and smoking behaviours? a systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors: Bull, Eleanor R
Dombrowski, Stephan U
McCleary, Nicola
Johnston, Marie
Contact Email: s.u.dombrowski@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Nov-2014
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Citation: Bull ER, Dombrowski SU, McCleary N & Johnston M (2014) Are interventions for low-income groups effective in changing healthy eating, physical activity and smoking behaviours? a systematic review and meta-analysis, BMJ Open, 4 (11), Art. No.: e006046.
Abstract: Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the effectiveness of behavioural interventions targeting diet, physical activity or smoking in low-income adults. Design: Systematic review with random effects meta-analyses. Studies before 2006 were identified from a previously published systematic review (searching 1995-2006) with similar but broader inclusion criteria (including non-randomised controlled trials (RCTs)). Studies from 2006 to 2014 were identified from eight electronic databases using a similar search strategy. Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ASSIA, CINAHL, Cochrane Controlled Trials, Cochrane Systematic Review and DARE. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies: RCTs and cluster RCTs published from 1995 to 2014; interventions targeting dietary, physical activity and smoking; low-income adults; reporting of behavioural outcomes. Main outcome measures: Dietary, physical activity and smoking cessation behaviours. Results: 35 studies containing 45 interventions with 17 000 participants met inclusion criteria. At postintervention, effects were positive but small for diet (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.22, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.29), physical activity (SMD 0.21, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.36) and smoking (relative risk (RR) of 1.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 1.89). Studies reporting follow-up results suggested that effects were maintained over time for diet (SMD 0.16, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.25) but not physical activity (SMD 0.17, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.37) or smoking (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.34). Conclusions: Behaviour change interventions for low-income groups had small positive effects on healthy eating, physical activity and smoking. Further work is needed to improve the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions for deprived populations.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22166
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006046
Rights: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Affiliation: NHS Grampian
Psychology
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen

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