Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21131
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The 2.1 Ga old Francevillian biota: Biogenicity, taphonomy and biodiversity
Authors: El, Albani Abderrazak
Bengtson, Stefan
Canfield, Donald E
Riboulleau, Armelle
Rollion-Bard, Claire
Macchiarelli, Roberto
Ngombi, Pemba Lauriss
Hammarlund, Emma
Meunier, Alain
Moubiya, Mouele Idalina
Benzerara, Karim
Bernard, Sylvain
Boulvais, Philippe
Chaussidon, Marc
White, Lee
Contact Email: l.j.white@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jun-2014
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: El Albani A, Bengtson S, Canfield DE, Riboulleau A, Rollion-Bard C, Macchiarelli R, Ngombi Pemba L, Hammarlund E, Meunier A, Moubiya Mouele I, Benzerara K, Bernard S, Boulvais P, Chaussidon M & White L (2014) The 2.1 Ga old Francevillian biota: Biogenicity, taphonomy and biodiversity, PLoS ONE, 9 (6), Art. No.: e99438.
Abstract: The Paleoproterozoic Era witnessed crucial steps in the evolution of Earth's surface environments following the first appreciable rise of free atmospheric oxygen concentrations ~2.3 to 2.1 Ga ago, and concomitant shallow ocean oxygenation. While most sedimentary successions deposited during this time interval have experienced thermal overprinting from burial diagenesis and metamorphism, the ca. 2.1 Ga black shales of the Francevillian B Formation (FB2) cropping out in southeastern Gabon have not. The Francevillian Formation contains centimeter-sized structures interpreted as organized and spatially discrete populations of colonial organisms living in an oxygenated marine ecosystem. Here, new material from the FB2 black shales is presented and analyzed to further explore its biogenicity and taphonomy. Our extended record comprises variably sized, shaped, and structured pyritized macrofossils of lobate, elongated, and rod-shaped morphologies as well as abundant non-pyritized disk-shaped macrofossils and organic-walled acritarchs. Combined microtomography, geochemistry, and sedimentary analysis suggest a biota fossilized during early diagenesis. The emergence of this biota follows a rise in atmospheric oxygen, which is consistent with the idea that surface oxygenation allowed the evolution and ecological expansion of complex megascopic life.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21131
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0099438
Rights: © 2014 El Albani et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Notes: Additional co-authors: Christian Cesari, Claude Fontaine, Ernest Chi-Fru, Juan Manuel Garcia Ruiz, François Gauthier-Lafaye, Arnaud Mazurier, Anne Catherine Pierson-Wickmann, Olivier Rouxel, Alain Trentesaux, Marco Vecoli, Gerard J. M. Versteegh, Martin Whitehouse, Andrey Bekker
Affiliation: University of Poitiers
Swedish Museum of Natural History
Nordic Center for Earth Evolution
Lille University of Science & Technology (University of Lille 1)
Centre de Recherches Pétrographiques et Géochimiques, France
University of Poitiers
University of Poitiers
Nordic Center for Earth Evolution
University of Poitiers
University of Poitiers
Sorbonne Universities
Sorbonne Universities
University of Rennes
Centre de Recherches Pétrographiques et Géochimiques, France
Biological and Environmental Sciences

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