Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21044
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The influence of head contour and nose angle on the perception of eye-gaze direction
Authors: Langton, Stephen
Honeyman, Helen
Tessler, Emma
Contact Email: srhl1@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jul-2004
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Langton S, Honeyman H & Tessler E (2004) The influence of head contour and nose angle on the perception of eye-gaze direction, Perception and Psychophysics, 66 (5), pp. 752-771.
Abstract: We report seven experiments that investigate the influence that head orientation exerts on the perception of eye-gaze direction. In each of these experiments, participants were asked to decide whether the eyes in a brief and masked presentation were looking directly at them or were averted. In each case, the eyes could be presented alone, or in the context of congruent or incongruent stimuli. In Experiment 1A, the congruent and incongruent stimuli were provided by the orientation of face features and head outline. Discrimination of gaze direction was found to be better when face and gaze were congruent than in both of the other conditions, an effect that was not eliminated by inversion of the stimuli (Experiment 1B). In Experiment 2A, the internal face features were removed, but the outline of the head profile was found to produce an identical pattern of effects on gaze discrimination, effects that were again insensitive to inversion (Experiment 2B) and which persisted when lateral displacement of the eyes was controlled (Experiment 2C). Finally, in Experiment 3A, nose angle was also found to influence participants' ability to discriminate direct gaze from averted gaze, but here the effectwas eliminated by inversion of the stimuli (Experiment 3B). We concluded that an image-based mechanism is responsible for the influence of head profile on gaze perception, whereas the analysis of nose angle involves the configural processing of face features.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21044
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03194970
Rights: Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository; The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Affiliation: Psychology
University of Stirling
University of Stirling

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Langton_2004.pdf1.67 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.