Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21029
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The role of Pleistocene refugia and rivers in shaping gorilla genetic diversity in central Africa
Authors: Anthony, Nicola M
Johnson-Bawe, Mireille
Jeffery, Kathryn Jane
Clifford, Stephen L
Abernethy, Katharine
Tutin, Caroline E G
Lahm, Sally A
White, Lee
Utley, John F
Wickings, E Jean
Bruford, Michael W
Contact Email: k.a.abernethy@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: control region
mitochondrial
phylogeography
refugium
Issue Date: Dec-2007
Publisher: National Academy of Sciences
Citation: Anthony NM, Johnson-Bawe M, Jeffery KJ, Clifford SL, Abernethy K, Tutin CEG, Lahm SA, White L, Utley JF, Wickings EJ & Bruford MW (2007) The role of Pleistocene refugia and rivers in shaping gorilla genetic diversity in central Africa, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104 (51), pp. 20432-20436.
Abstract: The role of Pleistocene forest refugia and rivers in the evolutionary diversification of tropical biota has been the subject of considerable debate. A range-wide analysis of gorilla mitochondrial and nuclear variation was used to test the potential role of both refugia and rivers in shaping genetic diversity in current populations. Results reveal strong patterns of regional differentiation that are consistent with refugial hypotheses for central Africa. Four major mitochondrial haplogroups are evident with the greatest divergence between eastern (A, B) and western (C, D) gorillas. Coalescent simulations reject a model of recent east-west separation during the last glacial maximum but are consistent with a divergence time within the Pleistocene. Microsatellite data also support a similar regional pattern of population genetic structure. Signatures of demographic expansion were detected in eastern lowland (B) and Gabon/Congo (D3) mitochondrial haplogroups and are consistent with a history of postglacial expansion from formerly isolated refugia. Although most mitochondrial haplogroups are regionally defined, limited admixture is evident between neighboring haplogroups. Mantel tests reveal a significant isolation-by-distance effect among western lowland gorilla populations. However, mitochondrial genetic distances also correlate with the distance required to circumnavigate intervening rivers, indicating a possible role for rivers in partitioning gorilla genetic diversity. Comparative data are needed to evaluate the importance of both mechanisms of vicariance in other African rainforest taxa.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21029
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0704816105
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of New Orleans
Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville
Biological and Environmental Sciences
Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville
Biological and Environmental Sciences
University of Stirling
Institut de Recherche en Ecologie Tropicale
Biological and Environmental Sciences
University of New Orleans
Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville
Cardiff University

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