Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20234
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The disengage deficit in hemispatial neglect is restricted to between-object shifts and is abolished by prism adaptation
Authors: Schindler, Igor
McIntosh, Robert D
Cassidy, Timothy P
Birchall, Daniel
Benson, Valerie
Ietswaart, Magdalena
Milner, A David
Contact Email: magdalena.ietswaart@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Neglect
Prism adaptation
Attention
Within-object
Posner
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Schindler I, McIntosh RD, Cassidy TP, Birchall D, Benson V, Ietswaart M & Milner AD (2009) The disengage deficit in hemispatial neglect is restricted to between-object shifts and is abolished by prism adaptation, Experimental Brain Research, 192 (3), pp. 499-510.
Abstract: We sought to determine the effects of prism adaptation on peripherally cued visual attention shifting in patients with spatial neglect, using a task devised by Egly et al. (J Exp Psychol Gen 123:161-177, 1994) based on the classic Posner paradigm. This task allowed a comparison of "within-object" versus "between-object" attention shifts. A display was presented containing two parallel outline rectangles, and subjects were asked to make rapid responses to a target, which would appear at one end of one of the rectangles. The target location was pre-cued with 75% validity: on invalid trials attention was directed either to the other end of the same rectangle, or to the other rectangle. Healthy subjects and right-hemisphere patients without neglect showed a left-right symmetrical pattern, with a larger validity effect when required to shift attention between rectangles, thus indicating a greater difficulty of attention-shifting between than within the respective shapes. The neglect patients showed the typical leftward "disengage deficit" previously observed in neglect, but only for attention shifts between objects, indicating that the effect is object-based rather than purely spatial. A comparison of vertical and horizontal shift costs showed that this attention-shifting deficit for left-hemifield target stimuli was directional rather than hemifield-based: it was absent for vertical shifts of attention within the left hemifield. Finally, we found that prism adaptation abolished the disengage deficit. We found no effects of prism adaptation in the control subjects. We argue that prism adaptation has a powerful effect on one of the fundamental manifestations of the neglect syndrome.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20234
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-008-1585-4
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Hull
University of Edinburgh
University Hospitals Birmingham
Newcastle General Hospital
University of Southampton
Psychology
Durham University

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