Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20231
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Social behavior following traumatic brain injury and its association with emotion recognition, understanding of intentions, and cognitive flexibility
Authors: Milders, Maarten
Ietswaart, Magdalena
Crawford, John R
Currie, David
Contact Email: magdalena.ietswaart@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: traumatic brain injury
social behavior
emotion recognition
theory of mind
cognitive flexibility
follow-up
Issue Date: Mar-2008
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Citation: Milders M, Ietswaart M, Crawford JR & Currie D (2008) Social behavior following traumatic brain injury and its association with emotion recognition, understanding of intentions, and cognitive flexibility, Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 14 (2), pp. 318-326.
Abstract: Although the adverse consequences of changes in social behavior following traumatic brain injury (TBI) are well documented, relatively little is known about possible underlying neuropsychological deficits. Following a model originally developed for social behavior deficits in schizophrenia, we investigated whether impairments in emotion recognition, understanding of other people's intentions ("theory of mind"), and cognitive flexibility soon after first TBI or 1 year later were associated with self and proxy ratings of behavior following TBI. Each of the three functions was assessed with two separate tests, and ratings of behavior were collected on three questionnaires. Patients with TBI (n = 33) were impaired in emotion recognition, "theory of mind," and cognitive flexibility compared with matched orthopedic controls (n = 34). Proxy ratings showed increases in behavioral problems 1 year following injury in the TBI group but not in the control group. However, test performance was not associated with questionnaire data. Severity of the impairments in emotion recognition, understanding intention, and flexibility were unrelated to the severity of behavioral problems following TBI. These findings failed to confirm the used model for social behavior deficits and may cast doubt on the alleged link between deficits in emotion recognition or theory of mind and social functioning.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20231
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1355617708080351
Rights: Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository. Published in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society / Volume 14 / Issue 02 / March 2008, pp 318-326 Copyright © 2008 The International Neuropsychological Society. The original publication is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1355617708080351
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
Psychology
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen Royal Infirmary

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